Is Recovery A Choice?

Is Recovery A Choice?

On our last Q&A post, Pinnacle Recovery discussed how addiction is not a choice. Is recovery, however, a choice? Pinnacle Recovery has got the answer for you. Unlike an addiction, recovery is most definitely a choice. Just like people who like to hurl out stigma regarding addictions, people also hurl stigma regarding recovery from those addictions. What they do not know, however, is how much time and energy goes into


How Living A Healthier Lifestyle Will Help To Combat Your Addiction

How Living A Healthier Lifestyle Will Help To Combat Your Addiction

Your lifestyle dictates a lot in your life. For many of those with an addiction, you build your lifestyle around your addiction. Thus, when you are attempting to recover, you then build your recovery around your lifestyle and addiction. This, however, should not be the case. You must begin to put recovery first. If your recovery does not become the most important thing in your life, you will find yourself


Is Addiction A Choice?

Is Addiction A Choice?

There are many misconceptions regarding addiction and recovery, mostly from people who are not struggling with recovering from an addiction. They, knowingly or unknowingly, spew stigma because they are unfamiliar with what someone suffering is going through. There is a common myth that goes around that says addiction is a choice. This myth is just that: a myth. It is the farthest thing from the truth. Be careful who you


Inpatient Versus Outpatient Services

Inpatient Versus Outpatient Services

Once you decide that you need treatment, it can be hard to decide exactly which treatment is right for you. Luckily, Pinnacle Recovery offers a multitude of services. Below are some characteristics of inpatient and outpatient treatment.  Inpatient Treatment Inpatient, or residential treatment, is characterized by the patient living on the premises of where they are receiving treatment, while they are receiving treatment. 24/7 care is provided for the patient


How Long Does Drug Addiction Treatment Usually Last?

How Long Does Drug Addiction Treatment Usually Last?

Treatment is all relative to the individual receiving treatment. Treatment should be tailored to you. Typically, however, inpatient treatment lasts between 30 and 90 days. “Studies have shown that it takes about 30 days to break the habit of addiction and regain firm footing in sobriety.” “The more time you can commit to this first stage of recovery, the better.” Depending on the length and severity of your addiction, is


How To Identify An Addiction Before It Begins

How To Identify An Addiction Before It Begins

Identifying an addiction in a loved one can be harder than it seems. You may feel some denial when thinking that a loved one has a problem. It’s important to remember that addiction is a disease, not a choice. The first step to getting your loved one help is recognizing the signs. According to HealthLine, here are some of the general signs of addiction: Lack of control, or inability to


What Is Withdrawal And How Long Does It Last?

What Is Withdrawal And How Long Does It Last?

A withdrawal occurs when you stop using the substance your body has become dependent on Long-term drug and alcohol use means your body very likely becomes dependent on the substance. A withdrawal may occur when you begin to taper off of the drug, or if you stop the use of the drug immediately. A withdrawal includes the physical and psychological symptoms that you may feel as your body detoxifies itself.


Not All Addictions Are Created Equal

Not All Addictions Are Created Equal

Your addiction is not the same as the person’s next to you. Addiction vary from person to person. No addiction is created equal. According to HelpGuide.org:  “Addiction exerts a long and powerful influence on the brain that manifests in three distinct ways: craving for the object of addiction, loss of control over its use, and continuing involvement with it despite adverse consequences.”  These three ways are different for everyone, depending


How Do I Know If Someone I Love Is Abusing A Substance?

How Do I Know If Someone I Love Is Abusing A Substance?

When dealing with someone that you love, there can often be some unintentional blindness. You may not want admit that they have an issue that they need to work through. They probably don’t want to acknowledge their struggles either. Denial is a strong feeling that all parties involved struggle with.  The first step for you, the caregiver, is acknowledge that there is an issue. This issue is bigger than you


Healthy Coping Skills For Co-Occurring Disorders

Oftentimes when someone is dealing with a substance use disorder, they may very well be dealing with another mental health disorder. Mood and anxiety disorders are common in people dealing with substance use. Having a substance use disorder while also having depression or anxiety would qualify as having a co-occurring disorder. These dual diagnoses are intertwined. Someone may have started using a substance to mask the symptoms of another illness they are dealing with. It is important to diagnose and treat both disorders that the person is dealing with. Here at Pinnacle Recovery, we have four unique dual diagnosis programs: (1) Anxiety and addiction, (2) Bipolar disorder and addiction, (3) Depression and addiction, and (4) PTSD and addiction. When dealing with these very real disorders, reaching out for drugs or alcohol may seem like a viable option to mask the pain. Throughout our programs, we aim to give you healthy coping skills that you can use in times of crisis, instead of reaching for drugs or alcohol. Although you may have used drugs or alcohol in the past to cope with your feelings, Pinnacle Recovery is here to give you healthy coping skills that will get you through the stressful situations. Sometimes those unhealthy coping skills will give you the quick fix, but it won’t be beneficial in the long run. When thinking about healthy coping skills, there are two main types of coping skills you can employ: problem-based and emotion-based coping skills. Problem-based coping skills: Problem-based coping skills are mainly used when you are in a stressful situation and you need to change the stressful situation. By challenging the stressful situation and removing it, you are able to lessen the stress that you are feeling. Some examples of problem-based coping skills: Establishing healthy boundaries Physically leaving the situation Managing your time better Problem solving Emotion-based coping skills: Emotion-based coping skills are usually used when you need to console your feelings during a stressful situation. Oftentimes, you cannot change your situation like you can do in problem-based situations, so you focus on distracting yourself to relieve the stressors. Some examples of emotion-based coping skills: Meditating Reading a book Exercising Art therapy Pinnacle Recovery is here for you when you are having trouble dealing with stressors. You may not think there is another way to deal with your emotions than using, but we are here to give you healthy coping skills so that you can be successful in your sobriety. If you have any questions about our programs, our staff is more than happy to help you. Call us today at 1-866-301-0573. We cannot wait to hear from you.

Oftentimes when someone is dealing with a substance use disorder, they may very well be dealing with another mental health disorder. Mood and anxiety disorders are common in people dealing with substance use. Having a substance use disorder while also having depression or anxiety would qualify as having a co-occurring disorder. These dual diagnoses are intertwined. Someone may have started using a substance to mask the symptoms of another illness


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