Alex Mayer, Therapist

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Alex is a University of Utah alum, Master’s level licensed clinician, with a concentration in mental health, having spent the past 5 years working in residential dual-diagnosis programs. Alex is passionate about working in this field, and believes in taking a person-centered approach to the treatment of substance use disorders and mental illness, consistent with the humanistic school of psychotherapy. Along with the modalities employed in the humanistic tradition, such as motivational interviewing and existentialism, Alex supplements his practice with ACT, CBT, and DBT interventions, which allows him to individualize treatment based on the client’s needs. He is unwavering in his commitment to maintaining the dignity and worth of the individuals he works with, and removing barriers to healing while teaching clients the skills necessary to cope with life’s inevitable ebbs and flows. Alex originally hails from the Bay Area, and enjoys playing basketball, photography, hiking, and writing.

Recent Posts

  • What Is Borrowed Shame?

    By definition, shame is “a painful emotion caused by consciousness of guilt, shortcoming, or impropriety,” or even, “a condition of humiliating disgrace or disrepute.” Shame can plague someone because of something that they have done wrong. Often, if someone gets caught doing something they shouldn’t be doing, they feel humiliated or embarrassed. There are others, … Continued

  • DBT Skills: TIPP

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a type of therapy that gives individuals the skills to practice mindfulness, distress tolerance, and emotional regulation. Today, Pinnacle Recovery is going to focus on one specific distress tolerance skill: TIPP.  To jog your memory, TIPP stands for Temperature, Intense exercise, Paced breathing, and Paired muscle relaxation. TIPP is meant … Continued

  • Does My Addiction Stem From Control?

    For those struggling with an addiction, there is probably a sense of control, or a lack thereof. Before the addiction has fully formed, someone may lean on a substance to feel a sense of control in their daily life. For example, someone with social anxiety may feel a lack of control in social settings; so, … Continued

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